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National Pan-Hellenic Council

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The National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) is a collaborative 

organization of nine historically African American, international Greek 

lettered fraternities and sororities that were founded on the principles of 

service, sisterhood/brotherhood and scholarship The nine NPHC 

organizations are referred to as the "Divine Nine". The NPHC aids and 

fosters the welfare of the Divine 9 Greek letter organizations at Alabama 

A&M University.

 

Active Organizations 

 

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was founded December 4, 1906, at Cornell University on the principles of scholarship, manly deeds and love for all mankind.

Visit National Site www.apa1906.net

 

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. was founded on November 17, 1911, at Howard University with the ideals of scholarship, perseverance, manhood and uplifting of human kind in their hearts and the hearts of others.

Visit National Site www.oppf.org

 

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. was founded on January 13, 1913, at Howard University as a public service sorority promoting academic excellence and providing assistance to the needy.

Visit National Site www.deltasigmatheta.org

 

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. was founded on January 9, 1914, at Howard University on the principles of brotherhood, scholarship and service.

Visit National Site http://phibetasigma1914.org/

 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. was founded on January 16, 1920, at Howard University with a vision predicated upon the ideals of scholarship, service, sisterly love and finer womanhood.

Visit National Site http://zphib1920.org/

 

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. was founded on November 12, 1922, at Butler University as an organization devoted to Greater Service, Greater Progress.

Visit National Site www.sgrho1922.org



STUDENT CODE of CONDUCT 

2.20 HAZING. Any action taken or situation of intimidation created, intentionally, whether on or off campus, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, ridicule, or the breaking of schools rules. Activities considered to be hazing include two elements: (1) Coercion, either overt or covert, and (2) Production of physical or mental discomfort, in either the participant(s) or spectators. ​​​​​​​​​​​